Ionic Bonding Notes Scaffold

  1. Valence Electrons
  2. Ion
    These atoms now have an overall charge that is indicated with a positive or negative superscript number just behind the element or compound symbol. Examples:

    Monatomic ions

    • Li+
    • Na+
    • Be2+
    • Cl
    • O2 –

    Polyatomic ions

    • (OH)     __________________ ion
    • (CO3)2 –     __________________ ion
    • __________________ –     sulfate ion
    • (HCO3)     bicarbonate ion
    • (NH4)+     __________________ ion
    • __________________     nitrate ion

  3. Ionization Energy
    Atoms with few valence electrons tend to lose electrons rather than gain more. Examples: most metals.
  4. Electron Affinity
    Atoms with many valence electrons tend to gain electrons rather than lose them since they often have high electron affinity and high ionization energy. Examples: most nonmetals.
  5. e Donators
    Atoms such as sodium donate an electron and their ions have a net charge of +1. Na1+ has one less electron than it has protons. Its outer shell has 8 e- and is considered full.
  6. e Acceptors
    Atoms such as fluorine accept an electron and their ions have a net charge of -1.   F1- has one more electron than it has protons. Its outer shell has 8 e- and is full.
  7. Ionic Bonds
    These compounds are held together by the strong attraction of their opposite charges that their ions have. Ionic compounds tend to: 






  8. Salts